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Little Girl Singing ‘Shine - It’s Okay to Be Different” in Special Way
Description
Nine year old Autistic girl sings “Shine - It’s Okay to be a Little Different”, in AUSLAN Sign Language.
Join her in sharing the message, ‘It’s okay to be a little differentIy and it’s okay to communicate differently’.
As a society, we so highly value speech ability, that in its absence we often fail to recognise other equally valid forms of communication.
This, despite the known fact that among the speaking community, only 7% of any message is conveyed through verbal words - 38% is through vocal elements such as tone and pitch, and a whopping 55% through non-verbal elements such as facial expressions, gestures and posture - and yet, we cling to the idea that speech ability has almost equivalent importance as our life’s blood.
Such is the misguided strength of the value society places on speech ability, that children (and adults) who communicate non-verbally are, more often than not, at best assumed ‘less than’, but more commonly (and quite wrongly) assumed incapable, unintelligent and incompetent.
We look forward to when we, as a society, innately understand that absence of speech does not equate to inability to understand speech; and when intelligence and competence is assumed.
And, we look forward to when the many valid and meaningful ways to communicate - technology systems, sign language, behaviour, writing, speech (including echolia), art, music - are recognised to be of equal value and importance.
It is perhaps only when we, as individuals, and as a community, understand that what we perceive as another’s communication ‘inabilities’, is infact, a measure of our own inability to interpret, understanding and communicate - in a method different to our own - that shared engagement, learning another’s communication method, mutual respect and genuine communication is possible.
Join Cadence in singing, and signing, out loud!

Credits: I am Cadence
1,786 views Nov 3, 2017
anonymous

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